18 6 / 2014

freshphotons:

A 3D model of synaptic architecture. ”We used an integrative approach, combining quantitative immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to determine protein numbers; electron microscopy to measure organelle numbers, sizes, and positions; and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to localize the proteins. Using these data, we generated a three-dimensional model of an “average” synapse, displaying 300,000 proteins in atomic detail.” Via.

(via infinity-imagined)

18 5 / 2013

The gamification of Biochemistry - the amazing Sugar Shake!  A new, free app for iPads.  Learn about glycolysis while playing a fun, roll-a-ball game. Get it here.


Created by Dynamoid Apps, 2013.

16 5 / 2013

arpeggia:

Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt) - Reticulárea, 1969-1980s, aluminum and stainless steel wire

(via staceythinx)

18 1 / 2013

geveducation:

An “inside the cell” 3D environment inside a portable planetarium dome, controlled by the Kinect!

From our future game, CosmDynamoid Apps is Laura Lynn Gonzalez and Blair Lyons.

18 1 / 2013

geveducation:


Powers of Minus Ten, now for Android!


Get it for iPad/iPhone here, and PC/Mac here.


This is my first ever animated GIF :)  -Laura Lynn

geveducation:

Get it for iPad/iPhone here, and PC/Mac here.

This is my first ever animated GIF :)  -Laura Lynn

17 1 / 2013

geveducation:

Screenshots from a cool 3D bio-world demo by Laura Lynn Gonzalez and Blair Lyons! We just put together a grant to continue work on this project, which originated as a failed kickstarter project ;) 

Check out the video which shows Blair navigating the environment using the KINECT!

The eventual game will be called Cosm.

17 1 / 2013

geveducation:

The Gamification of Science: Fit2Cure - a molecular binding game that has the potential to cure diseases (eventually… :D ) !!! Check out the game demo.

Created by Dynamoid Apps for Sayansia - Scientific discovery through gaming!

16 1 / 2013

geveducation:

Screenshots from the updated and magnificent Powers of Minus Ten!

Get it at the app store.

Or download for PC/Mac.

Also, all-new teacher resources section of the POMT website.

16 1 / 2013

geveducation:

Update: Here’s what the latest Powers of Minus Ten level looks like (currently)… DNA!!!

geveducation:

Update: Here’s what the latest Powers of Minus Ten level looks like (currently)… DNA!!!

15 1 / 2013

geveducation:

Yeah! Go Adrien!!

poptech:

“People can solve much more complex problems online. We are at the edge of human knowledge.” - Adrien Treuille (2011 PopTech Science Fellow)

Meet eteRNA, your new internet addiction. Not only is it a super-fun way to procrastinate on that thing you should be doing, it also helps to advance biology’s understanding of RNA and its synthesis - in a big way. Scientists from Stanford University and Carnegie Mellon University have developed eteRNA as a successor to Foldit, a popular internet-based game that proved the pattern-matching skills of amateurs could outperform some of the best protein-folding algorithms designed by scientists. They’re hedging their bets that eteRNA will work similarly - and are even funding the real-life synthesis of the weekly winner’s RNA molecule to see if it really does fold the same way the game predicts it should. 

The scientists hope to tap the internet’s ability to harness what is described as “collective intelligence,” the collaborative potential of hundreds or thousands of human minds linked together. Using games to harvest participation from amateurs exploits a resource which the social scientist Clay Shirky recently described as the “cognitive surplus” - the idea that together, as a collection of amateurs, we internet people make a very good algorithm because we react to information presented in a game, get better at it as we go along, and make informed decisions based on what has or hasn’t worked for us in the past. 

“We’re the leading edge in asking nonexperts to do really complicated things online,” says Dr. Treuille, an assistant professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon and one of the original masterminds behind the game. “RNA are beautiful molecules. They are very simple and they self-assemble into complex shapes. From the scientific side, there is an RNA revolution going on. The complexity of life may be due to RNA signaling.”

“This [project] is like putting a molecular chess game in people’s hands at a massive level,” he continues. “I think of this as opening up science. I think we are democratizing science.”

And, so far, the democratisation is working. Although the creators warn that game players may start to see legal and ethical issues in gameplay down the road, for now, the collective intelligence is trumping professionally designed algorithms. Significantly, not only do humans outperform their computer adversaries, but the human strategies developed during the course of the game are significantly more flexible and adaptable than those of the algorithms they’re pitted against.

So what are you waiting for? This isn’t procrastination, it’s being a part of a collective intelligence that’s smart enough to take down science’s finest algorithms. Click here (you know you want to) to get synthesising!

(viafyeahmolecularbiology)

(Source: amolecularmatter)